Possible economics incentives for The Brands development, new public work request system among two things to know from Windsor’s work session | MyWindsorNow.com
James Redmond
jredmond@mywindsornow.com

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Possible economics incentives for The Brands development, new public work request system among two things to know from Windsor’s work session

Windsor's town board met for a work session Monday night.

Here are two things to know about the work session:

1. More economic incentives

Later this month Windsor's town board will consider economics incentives for Martin Lind's development, The Brands East in southwest Windsor.

“According to documents from Lind’s Water Valley Land Company, they predict more than $120 million in annual sales from Windsor’s portion, more than $220 million in construction expenses and the creation of 1,990 permanent jobs and 1,750 construction jobs.

Last year Lind announced The Brands, a $500 million retail, entertainment and lifestyle center in Loveland and Windsor south of The Ranch. The proposed vision for Windsor's section, called The Brands East, includes retail, apartments, a medical facility and more.

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According to documents from Lind's Water Valley Land Company, they predict more than $120 million in annual sales from Windsor's portion, more than $220 million in construction expenses and the creation of 1,990 permanent jobs and 1,750 construction jobs.

Monday night, he presented Windsor's town board with an economic incentive package he told them he would need in order to make the development competitive with other areas seeking to attract retailers. The plan, he said, would be similar the one he crafted with Loveland. The entire development should have a level playing field and so economic incentives on one side don't outweigh the other.

The package proposed by Lind would offer two incentives — building permit fee waivers and time-limited sales tax rebates — based on the size of the business.

The proposal includes permit fees waivers of up to $6.60 per square foot of the building. However, with the town's fee structure no projects planned for the development would cost enough to claim the entirety of the fee waiver credit, said Town Manager Kelly Arnold.

The value of the sales tax rebates scales based on the size of the business.

Windsor has a 3.95 percent sales tax.

In the proposed incentives the largest retailer category, called anchors stores, would get 2 percentage points of the town's sale tax rebated — although through a roundabout method to accommodate Colorado tax law — for 25 years. The middle category, junior anchor stores, would get 2 percentage points of the town's sale tax rebated for 15 years then 1.25 percentage points for the next 10 years. All non-anchor stores would get a 1.25 percentage point sales tax rebate for 25 years.

Windsor town board will consider the incentive package during their March 27 meeting.

2. New resident request system

Last week Windsor launched a new system for residents to report issues and request work around town.

A digital map-base system, YourGOV allows anyone in town to submit a request directly into Windsor's new operations management software, Information Technology manager Cody Groves, told the town board Monday night.

The system works through a mobile application or a website and allows users to see work requests submitted by other community members. Through YourGov, anyone can see the status of their own, or someone else's, request and get notifications when the request is completed.

YourGOV is live online at http://bit.ly/2mFUNQN, next month town staff plan to start broadly advertising the system and how to use it.

The system works hand-in-hand the town's new operations management system, Cartegraph. Windsor's public works and park crews will use Cartegraph to track town assets, from benches to roads, and the work involved in maintaining them.

Town staff believes together the programs could create more efficient systems for keeping up with town maintenance and communicating work efforts to residents.

In additional to centralizing information, the program can track and manage scheduled and unscheduled maintenance, inspections and what resources crews use to complete tasks, said parks director Eric Lucas. It will allow officials to see how much time and money it takes to maintain different parts of town.