Second-graders get a hands-on history lesson at WSFR Museum | MyWindsorNow.com

Second-graders get a hands-on history lesson at WSFR Museum

Emily Wenger
ewenger@mywindsornow.com

About 30 Grandview Elementary School students worked together in a bucket brigade Friday morning to put out an imaginary fire at the Windsor Severance Fire Rescue Museum.

The second-graders passed buckets filled with brightly colored balls quickly down a line and emptied them into a kiddie pool before quickly passing them back.

Museum Curator Daniel Lowe cheered them on until all the balls had been dumped.

"Did we put the fire out?" he asked.

"Yeah!" the children called.

Lowe told the listening children fires were once fought by bucket brigades, which they all agreed took a long time and required a lot of people.

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Lowe then showed the children the evolution of firefighting, from the hand-drawn hose carts to modern fire engines, which only require two or three people to man them.

In 1902 or 1903, Lowe said, Windsor got fire hydrants for the first time. For his second activity, Lowe had second-graders Chase Sanger and Kyle Richmond pull a hand-drawn hose cart to unravel the hose, and students held it up and pretended to shoot out water.

Because Lowe is new to the museum, Lori Mathern, second grade teacher at Grandview Elementary, said other visits had not included interactive lessons.

"It's more of a learning experience when they can do hands-on activities," Mathern said.

Mathern said part of the school's curriculum includes teaching second-graders about Windsor history, so the museum visit fit well with her lesson plans.

Amy Sanger, whose son, Chase, was one of the second grade students on the museum visit, said she was enjoying herself as well.

"It's been fun, and interactive for the kids which is cool," she said.

If you go

The Windsor Severance Fire Rescue Museum will be open from noon-4 p.m. Saturdays at 121 N. 6th St.

Visits can be scheduled at other times by contacting Windsor Severance Fire Rescue at 720-686-2626.

The museum, staffed by volunteers, contains fire equipment, tools and memorabilia from the department’s history.

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