Social media threat made to Windsor High School; school official says no danger to students | MyWindsorNow.com

Social media threat made to Windsor High School; school official says no danger to students

Emily Wenger
ewenger@mywindsornow.com

Windsor High School sent an email to families Tuesday afternoon after a "potentially threatening message" was posted on social media. The school emphasized there was no threat to students' safety and school was not closed.

The email, from Windsor High School Principal Michelle Scallon, says the message posted on social media was related to the high school.

In the email, Scallon encourages parents to talk with their children.

"In the wake of a number of prank threats across the state, we encourage you to talk with your children about the seriousness of threats and the importance of reporting suspicious activities, threats or disturbing information to a trusted adult," she said.

Although police do not believe there is any connection between the incidents, one threat made in Weld County this week shut down Roosevelt High School in Johnstown. Windsor also received reports of social media threats last October.

Every threat, Scallon said, is reported to law enforcement, even if such threats are made as pranks.

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Windsor police Lt. Craig Dodd said because the incident remains under investigation he could not release any information about the nature of the threat. and the police department receives calls from area schools about threats made on social media as often as every week or every two weeks.

"We deal with it quite often," he said.

When contacted by an area school, Dodd said the department typically responds immediately and begins gathering information. The majority of calls regarding threats, he said, result in charges ranging from a felony to a misdemeanor being filed against the student or adult who made the threat.

"We take these types of threats seriously," he said. "That's why we have a zero tolerance for those types of activities."

Dodd also encouraged parents to discuss potential outcomes of threats made on social media with their children.

"Try to share with them the disruption that a simple text or a simple photograph with a text can cause," he said.

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