Windsor police say high school student breaks arm while resisting arrest | MyWindsorNow.com

Windsor police say high school student breaks arm while resisting arrest

James Redmond
jredmond@greeleytribune.com

— A Windsor High School freshman ended up with a broken arm last week after police say he refused to identify himself, resisted arrest and tried to escape from officers who responded to a disturbance at a fast food restaurant.

Authorities say the arresting officers did nothing wrong. Windsor police arrested the boy Jan. 17 on suspicion of obstructing an officer and resisting arrest. Because of the boy's age, The Greeley Tribune will not print his name.

About 4 p.m., Windsor police responded to McDonald's, 1061 Main St., because the manager reported several teenagers were causing problems — jumping in front of cars, cussing at employees — and refused to leave, according to police.

When officers confronted the boy, he refused to give his name and said he was going to leave if he wasn't under arrest. Police told him if he did not provide a name, they would place him under arrest. Police can arrest someone involved in an investigation if the person refuses to provide identification, said Windsor Police Chief Rick Klimek. It can't be done randomly, but when people are involved in police action they can be required to provide some kind of identification, he said. Verbal identification would have worked.

According to police documents, as offers attempted to place the boy under arrest, he struggled against the officers, despite instructions to stop resisting. Officers reported hearing the boy's arm snap as he tried to pull away from them.

Officer took the boy to the police station where medical personnel — requested by police — evaluated the boy.

Recommended Stories For You

Windsor police haven't received any complaints alleging wrongdoing in connection with the arrest, Klimek said. But, police review every instance of uses force by an officer, even if there isn't a complaint. Officials did not find any inappropriate actions by officers involved, he said.

"We don't want anybody to be hurt, especially in our hands, we strive not to do harm to people," Klimek said. "That isn't our calling."

Editor's note: This story has been corrected. In its original version, it stated the boy's wrist was broken.

Go back to article